3 Ways to Save on Cooling Costs

If you’re dreading the electric bills that are going to come with another hot Texas summer, don’t sit there thinking there’s nothing you can do about it. Small adjustments to your air conditioning system are all you need to slash your energy costs. Here’s how to get started:

Change Your Air Filters

If you squeeze part of a garden hose, less water comes out the end. Having a dirty air filter does the same thing to your air conditioner. Less air can get through, and that means less warm air being pulled in and less cool air coming out of your vents. Less air flow means your air conditioner needs to run longer and use more electricity to reach the same temperature. Be sure to regularly change your air filter to keep your air flow strong.

Install a Programmable Thermostat

Changing the temperature in your home by one degree for eight hours per day affects your monthly cooling bill by 1 percent. If you can raise the temperature by 10 degrees while you’re at work, you could save 10 percent on your energy bills. What might prevent you from doing this is not wanting to come home to a hot house or never remembering to adjust the thermostat when you leave. A programmable thermostat takes care of this for you by automatically changing the temperature according to your schedule.

Schedule Preventive AC Maintenance

You know your car’s performance and fuel efficiency decreases without regular oil changes and other routine maintenance. Your air conditioner is the same. As parts wear out or need to be realigned, your air conditioner’s energy efficiency drops. Each small problem can add a few dollars to your monthly energy bill. Scheduling preventive maintenance before the cooling season will ensure that anything causing your air conditioner to lose efficiency is fixed and it’s ready to work at maximum efficiency for the summer.

If you’re looking to cut your cooling costs in the Huntsville, TX, area, contact Beckham & Jones Heating & Air Conditioning. We’ve proudly served the community since 1946.